January 07, 2012

Lox & Gravlox are NOT the same. Next time, just the facts, ma'am, just the facts!

If you have grown up in a Jewish or Scandinavian household, the tale I am about to tell is a part of your heritage. If not, fellow foodie, "just sit right back and you'll hear a tale..the tale of a fateful........salmon fillet!" Come with me on a journey to discover Lox, and, the common misconceptions that have been foisted on an unsuspecting public, even by supposed culinary luminaries. That, my friends, is why it's a good thing I am here for you; to diligently give you culinary info that is both factual and entertaining. (if I may say so myself.)
First let's start with the definitions. We have Lox, Gravlox, Nova Lox. All share one commonality but, as some of you may not be be aware, they are completely separate and different products.

Lox
Lox is salmon fillet that has been cured. In its most popular form, the one most of us are familiar with, it is thinly sliced, less than 5 millimeters (0.20 in) in thickness and typically served on a bagel with cream cheese, onion, tomato, cucumber and capers. It is traditionally made by brining in a solution of water or oil, salt, sugars and spices (the brine). This was a very important item in Ashkenazic Jewish cuisine, but most are surprised that it was actually introduced to the United States through Scandinavian immigrants, then popularized by Jewish immigrants. The term lox derives from Lachs in German and לאקס (laks) in Yiddish, meaning "salmon." It is analogous of the Icelandic and Swedish lax, the Danish and Norwegian laks, and Old English læx. It may be commonly referred to as regular lox or belly lox, though technically, with belly lox, the flesh on both sides of the stomach of the salmon has a wider graining of fat, is less salty tasting and is more desirable and accordingly, more expensive. Below is a recipe to make your own Lox, which is absolutely fabulous and worth the effort, especially if you are a lox lover.

Gravlax
Gavlax, or gravad lax is a Nordic dish consisting of salmon, cured in salt, sugar, and dill. Gravlax is usually served as an appetizer, sliced thinly and accompanied by hovmästarsås (also known as gravlaxsås), a dill and mustard sauce. It is served on either bread of some kind, or with boiled potatoes.
In the Middle Ages, it was originally made by fishermen. They would salt the salmon, then bury it in the sand above the high-tide line. The word gravlax comes from the Scandinavian word grav, which literally means "grave" or "to dig" (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch and Estonian), and lax (or laks), means "salmon." Thus, gravlax literally means "buried salmon." Today, the salmon is coated with a spice mixture, which often includes dill, sugars, salt, and spices like juniper berry. It is then weighted down, which helps to to force the moisture from the fish (see recipe below) and impart the flavorings.

Nova Lox
Nova or Nova Scotia salmon, sometimes called Nova lox (or simply "Nova"), is cured with a milder brine and then cold-smoked. The name dates from a time when much of the salmon in New York City came from Nova Scotia. Today, however, the name refers to the more mildly brined product, and the fish may come from other waters or in some cases is raised on farms.

Smoked Salmon
Finally, smoked salmon is NOT lox, though products are sold under the name lox. Smoked salmon is just... well... smoked salmon.

I hope this clears up any misconceptions.While I may be being a bit, nitpicky (if there is such a word), you all know I like my readers to be the best informed foodie at the party, or in this case, brunch. Never let it be said that The Gourmet Guy left you with a schmear on your face.

Recipe for making your own Lox
Ingredients
1~2.5 to 3lb. salmon fillet (I prefer to use a skinless fillet, but if you prefer a less salty version, leave the skin on and remove after brining.)
1 cup Kosher salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar
The juice and zest of 1 lemon
The juice and zest of 1 lime

You'll need:
A 15" x 10" x .3/4" cookie sheet. Enough parchment paper to fully wrap the salmon. Tin foil. Something to weigh down the fillet. I use 3 large, 35.0z. cans of tomatoes. You can use bricks wrapped in foil or anything heavy enough to press down the fillet.

Method
~Combine salt and sugar and divide in half.
~Zest lemon, zest lime and combine with the juice from both. Set aside.
~On the parchment paper, spread out 1/2 the sugar/salt mixture and spread evenly to allow salmon to rest completely on mixture.
~Place salmon on salt/sugar mixture and completely cover with the lemon/lime mixture.
~Add the remaining salt/sugar mixture and press into salmon, covering completely.
~Wrap the salmon in the parchment paper, making sure it is sealed and covers the salmon completely.
~Wrap the entire fillet with tin foil, being careful that the foil at no time touches any part of the salmon.
~Place on the cookie sheet, place weights on top and refrigerate for 48 hours.
~Once you remove the salmon, wash under cold water thoroughly to remove brine mixture. Portion in 6-8 oz. portions, seal in freezer bag and use as needed  Slice very thin and enjoy!!

As always, Bon Appetit!

Lou

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